Press & Ratings

International Wine Challenge 2015 - GOLD

International Wine Challenge 2015
Land of Hope Chenin Blanc 2013 - Gold

  • From: Stellenbosch, South Africa
  • Grape: Chenin Blanc
  • Tasting Notes:
    White floral, pear and nutmeg notes with clear balancing acidity and a fat, creamy finish. Classic Cape Chenin.
  • Alcohol level: 13.5%

Source: International Wine Challenge


International Wine Challenge 2014 - Silver

International Wine Challenge 2014
Land of Hope Chenin Blanc 2012 - Silver

  • Produced by: Winery Of Good Hope
  • From: Stellenbosch, South Africa
  • Grape: Chenin Blanc
  • Tasting Notes:
    Pale lime, colour. Good lemon and fig characters on the nose. Silky rich mounth feel.
    Well balanced elegant wine. Fresh pleasant finish.
  • Alcohol level: 13.0%
  • Wine style: Still
  • Wine colour: White

Source: International Wine Challenge


International Wine Challenge 2014
Marks and Spencer Land of Hope Reserve Chenin Blanc 2012 - Silver

International Wine Challenge 2014 - Silver
  • Produced by: Buckingham Schenk
  • From: Stellenbosch, South Africa
  • Grape: Chenin Blanc
  • Tasting Notes:
    Lively flowery nose, energising acidity, mellow peach, citrus and grapefruit. Some tropical notes. Clean, fresh and a good length.
  • Alcohol level: 13.5%
  • Wine style: Still
  • Wine colour: White
  • Average Price: £15.99

Source: International Wine Challenge


Robert Parker November 2013

LAND OF HOPE Reserve Cabernet-Sauvignon 2011 89
LAND OF HOPE Reserve Chenin Blanc 2012 89

off licence news


Chenin Blanc Report
Classic Wine Magazine, March 2013

TOP 20
4 STARS

Land of Hope Reserve Chenin Blanc 2011
Pleasing floral frangapani notes and a compelling mineral acidity, naturally bestowed by its site. Balanced and poised, with lime cordial notes and just enough richness and a hint of spice on the palate with a lemon sparkle to refresh. Stellenbosch
R136.50


Download the January 2013 Land of Hope Newsletter


Wine Enthusiast
BUYING GUIDE: JULY 2012
89
Land of Hope 2010 Reserve Chenin Blanc (Stellenbosch)
Flavorful and harmonious, seductive notes of soft toast and walnut shell add
dimension to the honeydew, red apple and orange zest
notes. Medium weight, with good acidity and a lasting
finish, this is balanced and approachable now, with all of
the elements working together.


Wines of South Africa II
Tuesday, 28 February 2012 02:31
by Vic Harradine

Land of Hope Cabernet Sauvignon 2009
WO Stellenbosch $25.95 14.0% alcohol

Land of Hope is a trust providing education to workers and their families. The wines receive high praise and are highly sought after. Barrel fermented with 100% malolactic fermentation, this spent 16 months in 1/3 new oak barrels and a further 2 years in bottle before release. Rub-hued and brimming with alluring minty, red and dark berry fruit on the nose, it drenches the palate with a textured wash of complex and concentrated black currant, savoury spice and fennel underpinned by still-resolving tannin and framed by mouth-watering, red-fruit-laden acidity. Pop the cork 2014-2017 and pour with grilled, rosemary-rubbed lamb. (Vic Harradine)


2012 Platter Guide

Platter Guide 2012 - The Winery of Good Hope


Hopeful chenin
Submitted by Tim James on 24 January, 2012 - 07:31

Cinderella and workhorse were favourite clichés to describe the role of chenin blanc in the local wine industry of olden days. Well, it is a good few years since the horse has come to the ball and it is great to have her.

Although the quality of chenin blancs has undoubtedly improved (as well as being sometimes pushed too far with excessive ripeness, sugar and oak), quantity has fallen drastically. Chenin blanc used to occupy a third of the Cape vineyard, but is now at ­little more than 18%.

But no other variety has as large a ­proportion of old vines - many 40 years old at least - giving low crops, the intensity and finesse of which wine-lovers should happily pay a premium for and, incidentally, help to save such vineyards from ruthless, ­axe-­wielding accountants.

If the top end of chenin blanc production offers glory, the lower end offers real value. For less than R30 you can find decently made, fresh and fruity chenin blancs from the co-ops and former co-ops (Perdeberg, Boland, Swartland and Riebeek, for example) that are ­generally better and more interesting than anything else at the price.

From there it is only up. The quality ladder is neatly illustrated by four wines from one of the leading producers of good chenin blanc, the Stellenbosch-based Winery of Good Hope. It is a cheerful and appropriate name for a winery that is building its reputation by delivering on quality throughout its large range and through sincere ethical practices - although, because it buys in many grapes, it can ensure good working conditions only for its own winery and office staff.

Managing director Alex Dale told me what his ­lowest-paid cellar worker earned and it was something like three times the minimum legal wage - a minimum certainly not universally observed.

"Everyday-drinking" level here is met and exceeded by the Winery of Good Hope Bush Vine Chenin Blanc, as good a mouthful of wine as it is of words. No dumbing down here: it is properly dry with fresh brightness integrated into a round, well-fruited, light richness. You would be lucky to find as good and characterful a white wine as this for about R49.

Next step up, half as much again in rand terms, is Vinum Chenin Blanc. The showiest of the wines, perhaps, it gently flaunts evidence of the oak barrels in which it was matured, with added spicy complexity and depth to the ripe fruit, as well as a broader, smoother texture.

Genuine seriousness starts with the Land of Hope range (there is also a good cabernet), which benefits a trust primarily dedicated to the education of employees' children. It was recognised by the Financial Mail as the best sustainable black economic empowerment deal of 2008. Behind the attractive label (featuring what is presumably a "tree of knowledge") is an equally appealing chenin blanc, beautifully balanced and harmonious, subtly oaked, fine and quietly assertive, with genuine personality.

Like the others reviewed, it has a modest alcohol level at little more than 13% and like them all it is safely under screw cap and not cork.

These qualities are further refined in the lovely Renaissance Chenin Blanc in the winery's top range, Radford Dale. With a pebbly, stony quality, there is an element of austere but not intimidating restraint containing the rich fruit from a single Helderberg vineyard. The two top wines are R140 and R175, respectively, and worth the money. Fulfilling hope never was cheap.

From Mail & Guardian, 20-26 January 2012


The Independant
Anthony Rose - 16 December 2011

17. Land of Hope Reserve 2010
This stylish barrel-fermented, old vine chenin blanc from the Cape is exotically concentrated and rich with a blend of honeyed fruit and nutty characters contained in a framework of zingy freshness. Land of Hope and Glory indeed.

Where: Marks & Spencer
How much: £14.99

 


Mail & Guardian, December 2011
Tim James

Cinderella and workhorse were favourite clichés to describe the role of chenin blanc in the local wine industry of olden days. Well, it’s a good few years since the horse has come to the ball, and it’s great to have her.

While the overall quality of chenins has undoubtedly improved (as well as being sometimes pushed too far with excessive ripeness, sugar and oak), quantity has fallen drastically. Chenin used to occupy a third of the Cape vineyard, but is now at little more than 18 percent. But no other variety has as large a proportion of old vines, many 40 years at least, giving low crops, for whose intensity and finesse winelovers should happily pay a premium – incidentally helping to save such vineyards from ruthlessly axe-wielding accountants.

If the top end of chenin production offers glory, the lower end, from more intensive farming, offers real value. For under R30 you can find decently made, fresh and fruity chenins from the co-ops and former co-ops (Perdeberg, Boland, Swartland, Riebeek, for example) – generally better and more interesting than anything else at the price.

From there it’s only up. The quality ladder is neatly illustrated by four wines from one of the leading producers of good chenin, Stellenbosch-based Winery of Good Hope. It’s a cheerful and appropriate name for a winery which is building its reputation by over-delivering on quality throughout its large range. And by sincere ethical practices – although, as it buys in many grapes, it can ensure good working conditions only for its own winery and office staff. MD Alex Dale told me what is earned by his lowest paid cellar worker, and it’s something like three times the minimum legal wage - a minimum certainly not universally observed.

The “everyday drinking” level here is met and exceeded by the Winery of Good Hope Bush Vine Chenin Blanc – as good a mouthful of wine as it is of words. No dumbing down here: it’s properly dry, with fresh brightness integrated into a round, well-fruited light richness. You’d be lucky to find as good and characterful white wine as this for around R49.

Next step up, half as much again in rand terms, is Vinum Chenin Blanc. The showiest of the wines, perhaps, it gently flaunts evidence of the oak barrels it was matured in, with added spicy complexity and depth to the ripe fruit as well as a broader, smoother texture.

Genuine seriousness starts with The Land of Hope range (there’s also a good cabernet) which benefits a trust primarily dedicated to the education of employees’ children - recognised by the Financial Mail as the best sustainable BEE (wine) deal of 2008. Behind the attractive label (featuring what is presumably a “tree of knowledge”) is an equally appealing chenin, beautifully balanced and harmonious, subtly oaked, fine and quietly assertive, with genuine personality. Like the others reviewed it has a comparatively modest alcohol level - little more than 13%. And like them all it is safely under screwcap rather than cork.

These qualities are further refined in the lovely Renaissance Chenin Blanc in the winery’s top range, Radford Dale. With a pebbly, stoney quality, there’s an element of austere but unintimidating restraint containing the rich fruit from a single Helderberg vineyard. The two top wines are R140 and R175 respectively, and worth the money. Fulfilling hope never was cheap.


Land of Hope, Reserve Chenin Blanc 2010 Stellenbosch
Jancis Robinson, October 2011

A joint venture between The Winery of Good Hope and the Land of Hope Trust. Helderberg vineyards, unirrigated old (about 45 years) bushvines on clay. TA 5.9 g/l, pH 3.59, RS 5 g/l.
Broad and silky. Great texture. 16 points - drink 2012-2015

Land of Hope, Reserve Pinot Noir 2010 Western Cape
Jancis Robinson, October 2011

From Stellenbosch and Elgin. Light, correct nose. Lots of dark frank fruit. Nice and dry with plenty of grunt on the end. 16.5 points - drink 2011-2013


Sarah Ahmed – The Wine Detective
Standout Chenin Blanc: The Winery of Good Hope & Land of Hope, South Africa

Posted Monday 24th October 2011

LAnd of Hope Chenin Blanc

I wrote up highlights from themed tables at Wines of South Africa’s Cape Wine Europe trade tasting here last week. At the Chenin Blanc table, The Winery of Good Hope’s Radford Dale Renaissance Chenin Blanc 2010 was my pick of the bunch.

It’s not the only great Chenin The Winery of Good Hope (TWGH) make – I was really impressed with their feel for the variety across the range. Check out my notes below, which include wines from their Land of Hope label, the direct beneficiaries of whom are the previously disadvantaged employees of TWGH and their children and dependents.

Incidentally, the bright and crunchy Radford Dale Freedom Pinot Noir 2010 and Land of Hope Reserve Pinot Noir 2010 were among my Pinot highlights of the tasting too. Alex Dale reckons that, with increased vine age, there’s been a big difference in fruit quality in the last two years.

The Winery of Good Hope Bush Vine Chenin Blanc 2011 (Stellenbosch)

Just bottled a week previously having been aged for 6 months on gross lees, this shows impressive fruit brightness to its honey-licked fresh apple and pear fruit. It’s got a lovely unworked quality to it. Very balanced.

Vinum Chenin Blanc 2010 (Stellenbosch)

The fruit for this wine hails from old bush vines located in the foothills of the Helderberg Mountain, on South & South-Easterly slopes facing the ocean. Around 20% was fermented and aged in barrels (an equal mix of new, 2nd, 3rd & 4th fill) and the whole was aged on the lees for 12 months with occasional batonnage. It’s soft, ripe and round with attractive, juicy white orchard fruits, blossom and honey, the oak worn very lightly. With its gently rolling palate, it’s what I call a backfoot wine – doesn’t come at you all assertive with fruit and oak – very much seems to be the direction in which premium modern South African Chenin is going. Well done.

Radford Dale Renaissance Chenin Blanc 2010 (Stellenbosch)

This is TWGH’s flagship label and is fermented and aged in Burgundy barrels, under 20% new. Because it’s sourced from a single block of old, un-irrigated bush vine located on the Helderberg’s cooler, higher slopes, also the fruit is picked a little earlier, the Renaissance Chenin is wonderfully animated, mineral too. Crisp and fresh with a vibrant core of quince and apple. Lovely purity and persistence to its subtly honeyed finish. A clear-eyed beauty.

Land of Hope Chenin Blanc 2011 (Stellenbosch)

Seemingly a more oxidative in style than The Winery of Good Hope Bush Vine Chenin Blanc 2011, it has a deep yellow hue with a textured palate which shows bruised apple and steely apple core fruit, a touch earthy even. Lots of character – well differentiated from TWGH label though it shares that unworked quality. Good food wine.

Land of Hope Reserve Chenin Blanc 2010 (Stellenbosch)

Like the entry level Land of Hope Chenin, the Reserve has an attractive rustic edge and, looking at the website, the previous vintages of both had an element of whole bunch ferment, which makes sense of their textured palates. The fruit here is more vibrant - quite possibly a vintage trait – all crunchy green apple and steely grapefruit. Good length and structure. A guiless quality. Very good.


Chenin Blanc a sweet versatile grape

By Anthony Gismondi, Special To The Sun September 17, 2011 Read more...


Antony Gismondi, Canada - 2011-09-05

The Land of Hope Reserve Chenin Blanc 2009
Stellenbosch, Coastal Region, South Africa

The wine stems from old bush vines grown in the Helderberg area of Stellenbosch. Ocean facing you can taste the minerality in the wine. Loves the fresh flinty leesy, Burgundian feel of this chenin. Perfect with grilled salmon. Co-Owner Alex Dale is an impressive wine grower working in South Africa so when he says the Land of Hope Trust project, launched in 2007, was initiated against the background of many “smoke and mirrors” projects purporting to uplift Previously Disadvantaged Individuals (PDI) we believe him. In this case the direct and sole beneficiaries of this Trust are the previously disadvantaged individual employees of Winery of Good Hope and their children and dependents. Now back to the wine.

Price: BC $26.00 (750 ml) specialty listing
CSPC: 162586;   UPC: 00854954000322
Producer: The Winery of Good Hope
Distributor: Liberty Merchant Company

Score:  89/100



2011 Platter Guide

4½ Stars Cabernet Sauvignon: Elegant, classic, single vineyard 08 seriously styled and expressive. Spicy, plush tannins enfold layers of voluptuous, compact red fruit, herbs and fine mineral core, to form an appetizing, satisfying whole. Deftly oaked (16 months French, 25% new)

4½ Stars (5 Star Nominee) Chenin Blanc: floral 09… to reveal complex layers of lightly spicy, sweet yellow apples, perfectly poised acidity, minerality. Oak (11 months 20% new) provides subtle platform for concentrated flavours.


Land of Hope Chenin Blanc

 

 

 

 

 

Land of Hope Chenin Blanc Receives Gold

In May 2010, the Land of Hope Chenin received the only Gold medal for a Chenin Blanc in South Africa’s foremost competition The Trophy Wine Show, scoring 94 Points in the process. This at its first attempt.


2009 Financial Mail Best Sustainable Black Economic Empowerment Deal Award

The Land of Hope team receiving in February 2010 the Financial Mail Wine Award for Best sustainable Black Economic empowerment deal of 2009 (second consecutive year that this accolade has been awarded to Land of Hope).

Read more...


Chenin Challenge 2010

WINE Magazine, South Africa - February 2010

Land of Hope Chenin Blanc 2008
4 Stars, finishing 5th = out of 134 wines competing.
Hint of oak on otherwise shy nose. The palate is rich and weighty with lots of fruit and oak. Packed with flavour: vanilla, peach and tropical fruit.


Wine of the week

WINE Magazine, South Africa - 5 February 2010

Land of Hope 2008 (est. price R125)
Hint of oak on otherwise shy nose. The palate is rich and weighty with lots of fruit and oak. Packed with flavour: vanilla, peach and tropical fruit. Drink now or over the next three years.


Platter Guide 2010

***** Superlative. A Cape classic
****½ Outstanding
**** Excellent
***½ Very good/promising
*** Characterful, appealing
**½ Good everyday drinking
** Pleasant drinking
Casual quaffing
Plain and simple
½ Very ordinary
No Star

Somewhat less than ordinary
Exceptionally drinkable & well priced
Good Value distinction

4½ Stars Cabernet-Sauvignon: Elegant Bordeaux-inspired 07 classic, beautifully complex with mineral core; expressive blackcurrant flavours restrained by herbal edge & judicious oak (16 months French). Perfect, refreshing food wine ex Helderberg vines. Proceeds from these to Educational Trust for staff children.

4 Stars Chenin Blanc: Wonderful minerality & richness in expressive 08; fine, vibrant acidity in harmony with sumptuous baked apple fruit, driving flavoursome finish. Mainly old Helderberg bushvines.


Land of Hope Chenin Blanc

 

 

 

 

The 2008 Financial Mail Wine Business Awards in South Africa saw the inaugural award for BEST SUSTAINABLE BLACK ECONOMIC EMPOWERMENT WINE DEAL being presented to Land of Hope. This in recognition of the ”…completely innovative and transparent funding model, the direct benefit to the stated beneficiaries and the profound impact of this project on a whole generation of employees’ children”, according to competition organizer John Woodward.


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